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Little by Little Beag air Bheag

Beginners (A1)- Unit 2 - Introducing yourself
Luchd-tòiseachaidh (A1) - Aonad 2 - Introducing yourself

Introduction

Is mise Seumas

I’m James

Why not break the ice?

You can start a simple conversation by introducing yourself.
Hear also how to ask somebody else his or her name.

Listen to the following examples of people explaining who they are using either sibh or thu. Then have a go at Test yourself to see how much you have picked up!

What’s your name?

Is mise Seumas

I’m James

Halò. Is mise Seumas.

Hello. I’m James.

Halò. Is mise Ceitidh.

Hello. I’m Katie.

Dè an t-ainm a th’ oirbh?

What’s your name?

Sibh Remember that you also use the plural form of you - sibh - to speak to strangers, an older person, or someone in authority ( see Unit 1)

You (formal/polite/plural)

When you ask somebody their name using the sibh form, the word sibh does not actually appear.

It is instead combined with the preposition air, which means 'on', to make oirbh which means 'on you'.

air + sibh

Oirbh

on + you


In Gaelic we say, literally, 'what name is on you?'

A short conversation using sibh

Listen to this short conversation. It includes some elements discussed in Unit 1.

Halò. Is mise Seumas.

Hello. I’m James.

Is mise Ceitidh.

I’m Katie.

Ciamar a tha sibh, a Cheitidh?

How are you, Katie?

Tha mi gu math, tapadh leibh, a Sheumais.

I’m well, thanks, James.

Is math sin.

That’s good.

Mar sin leibh, an-dràsta.

See you.

Mar sin leibh.

Goodbye.

What's your name?

Halò. Is mise Seumas.

Hello. I’m James.

Halò. Is mise Ceitidh.

Hello. I’m Katie.

Dè an t-ainm a th’ ort?

What’s your name

Thu Remember that you also use the singular form of you - sibh - to speak to a child, a friend, or somebody of a similar age (see Unit 1)

You (informal/singular)

When you ask somebody their name, using the thu form, the word thu does not appear. It is instead combined with the preposition air, which means 'on', to make ort which means 'on you'.

air + thu

Ort

on + you

In Gaelic we say, literally, 'what name is on you?'

A short conversation using thu

Listen to this short conversation. It includes some elements discussed in Unit 1.

Halò. Is mise Seumas.

Hello. I’m James.

Is mise Ceitidh.

I’m Katie.

Ciamar a tha thu, a Cheitidh?

How are you, Katie?

Tha mi gu math, tapadh leat, a Sheumais.

I’m well, thanks, James.

Is math sin.

That’s good.

Mar sin leat, an-dràsta.

See you.

Mar sin leat.

Goodbye.

Conversation 1

Listen to this longer conversation. Malcolm and Katie are chatting together (using sibh, rather than thu). They talk about a third person, James, who then joins in with the conversation. You can pick up some new words here, but it is all fairly straightforward!

Conversation 2

Listen to Malcolm and Katie chatting to James, this time using thu and ort.

Now, how would you tell somebody where you are from? Find out in Unit 3 - Cò às a tha sibh?

Beannachd leibh!

Bye!

Conversation 1

Listen to the conversation:

Malcolm:
Halò. Is mise Calum. Dè an t-ainm a th’ oirbh?
Hello. I’m Malcolm. What’s your name?
(lit. What name is on you?)
Katie:
Halò, a Chaluim. Is mise Ceitidh.
Hello, Malcolm. I’m Katie.
Malcolm:
Ciamar a tha sibh, a Cheitidh?
How are you, Katie?
Katie:
Tha mi gu math, tapadh leibh. Ciamar a tha sibh fhèin?
I’m well, thanks. How are you?
(lit. How are you yourself?)
Malcolm:
Tha mise gu math cuideachd.
I’m fine too.
Katie:
A Chaluim, dè an t-ainm a th’ air an duine sin?
Malcolm, what’s that man’s name?
Malcolm:
Seumas. ’S e Seumas an t-ainm a th’ air.
James. His name is James.
Katie:
Gabhaibh mo leisgeul Gabh mo leisgeul changes to Gabhaibh mo leisgeul when using the sibh form. , a Sheumais …
Excuse me, James …
James:
Seadh?
Uh-huh?
Katie:
Gabhaibh mo leisgeul Gabh mo leisgeul changes to Gabhaibh mo leisgeul when using the sibh form. . An e Seumas an t-ainm a th’ oirbh?
Excuse me. Is your name James?
James:
’S e. Is mise Seumas. Dè an t-ainm a th’ oirbh fhèin?
Yes. My name is James. What’s your name?
(lit. What name is on you yourself?)
Katie:
Is mise Ceitidh. Agus seo Calum.
I’m Katie. And this is Malcolm.
James:
Halò, a Cheitidh. Halò a Chaluim. Ciamar a tha sibh?
Hi, Katie. Hi, Malcolm. How are you?
Katie & Malcolm:
Tha sinn gu math, tapadh leibh.
We’re well, thanks.
James:
Is math sin.
That’s good.

Conversation 2

Listen to the conversation:

Malcolm:
Halò. Is mise Calum. Dè an t-ainm a th’ ort?
Hello. I’m Malcolm. What’s your name?
(lit. What name is on you?)
Katie:
Halò, a Chaluim. Is mise Ceitidh.
Hello, Malcolm. I’m Katie.
Malcolm:
Ciamar a tha thu, a Cheitidh?
How are you, Katie?
Katie:
Tha mi gu math, tapadh leat. Ciamar a tha thu fhèin?
I’m well, thanks. How are you?
(lit. How are you yourself?)
Malcolm:
Tha mise gu math cuideachd.
I’m fine too.
Katie:
A Chaluim, dè an t-ainm a th’ air an duine sin?
Malcolm, what’s that man’s name?
Malcolm:
Seumas. ’S e Seumas an t-ainm a th’ air.
James. His name is James.
Katie:
Gabh mo leisgeul Gabh mo leisgeul changes to Gabhaibh mo leisgeul when using the sibh form. , a Sheumais …
Excuse me, James …
James:
Seadh?
Uh-huh?
Katie:
Gabh mo leisgeul Gabh mo leisgeul changes to Gabhaibh mo leisgeul when using the sibh form. . An e Seumas an t-ainm a th’ ort?
Excuse me. Is your name James?
James:
’S e. Is mise Seumas. Dè an t-ainm a th’ ort fhèin?
Yes. My name is James. What’s your name?
(lit. What name is on you yourself?)
Katie:
Is mise Ceitidh. Agus seo Calum.
I’m Katie. And this is Malcolm.
James:
Halò, a Cheitidh. Halò a Chaluim. Ciamar a tha sibh?
Hi, Katie. Hi, Malcolm. How are you?
Katie & Malcolm:
Tha sinn gu math, tapadh leat.
We’re well, thanks.
James:
Is math sin.
That’s good.